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  THE LOW INCOME & URBAN HOUSING BLOG  

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Why People in This City Are Literally Sleeping in the Streets

Homeless people living in tents

Affordable housing in America has reached a crisis state. Even last year, a report revealed that zero counties in the U.S. have enough housing for families in extreme poverty. Large cities are particularly challenged to supply enough affordable housing, but one city in particular has the highest rate in the U.S. for homeless people sleeping in the streets.

What is happening to low-income families in San Francisco

Homeless people are sleeping on the streets, in cars, in tents, or seeking shelter in abandoned buildings in San Francisco. They number about 7,000, and according to a 2015 Homeless Point-In-Time Count & Survey Comprehensive Report, 71 percent of them once had jobs, and homes. What happened?

It isn't just one event but a combination that have created a significant amount of homelessness in San Francisco. Technology jobs increased, home prices increased, but housing programs and social services for low-income people decreased. Even the voucher system that subsidizes rent for low-income families is failing many. San Francisco’s Housing Choice Voucher program allows low-income people to live in affordable apartments. Residents pay just 30 percent of the total rent cost, and the housing program pays the rest.

Beaten by the system

However, with rent prices rising quickly, many low-income cannot afford to pay the 30 percent. The voucher system is failing to meet the demands of affordable housing for the poorest, and they end up having no other choice but to live on the streets. These homeless people are not bums, they aren't lazy, they have just been beaten by the system.

Do you think this could happen in your city?

Read more at www.pulseheadlines.com/san-franciscos-housing-crisis-lowincome-residents/39242/
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